Photo
Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote:

Head coach Scott Cross, center, supervises his staff doing defensive drills with the Men’s basketball team. The team started practice Monday for the upcoming season in the Western Athletic Conference. 

A lot of times when shooting sports we think to focus solely on the action. Get the guy with the ball, follow him with the camera, and capture his every move until something good happens. We sometimes forget that we actually need to take a [moment] to step back and think about the overall composition.
In this shot Casey used his photographer’s eye and found a great framing opportunity. Not only do you get the head coach in the center watching over the coaching staff and players running drills, but there’s also a hierarchy. The head coach is the sole person in the center. You get his coaching staff right under him working with the players that are underneath them.
It’s interesting when you think about it. Whether intentional or not it creates a great photo that goes deeper than just the action.

Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote:

Head coach Scott Cross, center, supervises his staff doing defensive drills with the Men’s basketball team. The team started practice Monday for the upcoming season in the Western Athletic Conference. 

A lot of times when shooting sports we think to focus solely on the action. Get the guy with the ball, follow him with the camera, and capture his every move until something good happens. We sometimes forget that we actually need to take a [moment] to step back and think about the overall composition.

In this shot Casey used his photographer’s eye and found a great framing opportunity. Not only do you get the head coach in the center watching over the coaching staff and players running drills, but there’s also a hierarchy. The head coach is the sole person in the center. You get his coaching staff right under him working with the players that are underneath them.

It’s interesting when you think about it. Whether intentional or not it creates a great photo that goes deeper than just the action.

(Source: theshorthorn.com)


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote:

Ph.D space physics Robert Bruntz and electronic tech staff Douglas Coyne, not shown, displays a Van De Graaff generator Monday in Science Hall. A professor asked them to find a model to use as a demonstration.

A big theme lately has been to be on the lookout and be patient. Of all the photos shot in this series, this was the only one where the photographer caught the spark of electricity. The other photos were good but they were just missing that one thing. If you’re out shooting something and you know what you want, don’t stop until you get it. Almost isn’t good enough. Patience is all you need to get the shot just like you want it.

Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote:

Ph.D space physics Robert Bruntz and electronic tech staff Douglas Coyne, not shown, displays a Van De Graaff generator Monday in Science Hall. A professor asked them to find a model to use as a demonstration.

A big theme lately has been to be on the lookout and be patient. Of all the photos shot in this series, this was the only one where the photographer caught the spark of electricity. The other photos were good but they were just missing that one thing. If you’re out shooting something and you know what you want, don’t stop until you get it. Almost isn’t good enough. Patience is all you need to get the shot just like you want it.

(Source: theshorthorn.com)


Video

Independence Day is upon us! Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang will show you how to make some quick and easy (and cheap!) 4th of July treats. Whether you’re having a big party, a small gathering of close friends, or just sitting home watching the fireworks from your window, these treats will add some red, white, and blue to whatever your holiday plans are!

(Source: theshorthorn.com)

Photo
Shorthorn photographer Michael Minasi wrote:

From 8-10 p.m. Mav Fest featured free bowling and billiards to any students that came by Monday at Bowling and Billiards. 

A detail shot doesn’t necessarily mean getting a close up of someone hands. Sometimes it can simply be a small part of a bigger story. The story here is Mav Fest featured free bowling and billiards. This detail shot shows the billiards part of the story. It’s not showing everything that’s going on because then it becomes an overall or establishing shot rather than a detail. A detail shot is simply that, a detail of the story.
See the photo galleryWatch the video 

Shorthorn photographer Michael Minasi wrote:

From 8-10 p.m. Mav Fest featured free bowling and billiards to any students that came by Monday at Bowling and Billiards. 

A detail shot doesn’t necessarily mean getting a close up of someone hands. Sometimes it can simply be a small part of a bigger story. The story here is Mav Fest featured free bowling and billiards. This detail shot shows the billiards part of the story. It’s not showing everything that’s going on because then it becomes an overall or establishing shot rather than a detail. A detail shot is simply that, a detail of the story.

See the photo gallery
Watch the video 


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote:

Architecture and city planning graduate student Milad Fereshtehnezhad submitted a plan to that was approved by the Arlington Urban Design Center to redesign the Mesquite street side of the Arlington Public Library. Work is currently underway.

Photography isn’t just about taking a pretty picture, it’s also about telling a story. The key is to compose the photo in a way that encompasses all the elements of the story without the photo becoming cluttered and messy. In this photo you get the subject and “Arlington Urban Design Center” in the foreground. In the back you get the different city plans hanging on the wall. This tells you that the story has something to do with architecture and the Arlington Urban Design Center. Right there you already get half of the story without having to read the cutline.
The key in story telling is composition. Without good execution you leave a lot of people with unanswered questions.

Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote:

Architecture and city planning graduate student Milad Fereshtehnezhad submitted a plan to that was approved by the Arlington Urban Design Center to redesign the Mesquite street side of the Arlington Public Library. Work is currently underway.

Photography isn’t just about taking a pretty picture, it’s also about telling a story. The key is to compose the photo in a way that encompasses all the elements of the story without the photo becoming cluttered and messy. In this photo you get the subject and “Arlington Urban Design Center” in the foreground. In the back you get the different city plans hanging on the wall. This tells you that the story has something to do with architecture and the Arlington Urban Design Center. Right there you already get half of the story without having to read the cutline.

The key in story telling is composition. Without good execution you leave a lot of people with unanswered questions.

(Source: theshorthorn.com)


Photoset

Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote (left):

The photo was taken at an aperture of 1.8 and the main focus was on the main dish (beef stew). I used a flash to bounce off the ceiling to get light to hit the stew since it was in a bowl. A drink and loaf of bread is used to add more content into the photo but not distract the viewer from the main dish.

Shorthorn photographer Brandon Gray wrote:

I wanted the theme to be lunch obviously. I really wanted to focus on the chicken wraps. More on the ingredients inside of the wrap rather than what is surrounding it. Florescent lighting was in the room. I used a flash which was pointed to the ceiling.

When photographing food it’s not always about everything on the plate. When you try to focus on everything people don’t know what to look at. Here our photographers knew what part of their meal they wanted to focus on. To do that you not only need to focus on the area you want, but also bring the aperture down. As Richard said about his photo, his aperture was set at 1.8. When the aperture is low it helps clean up the background and keeps it from distracting from the main focus.

Everyone eats food everyday, so right before you dig in to your meal try to snap a photo of it focusing on just one part of the meal. It could be anything from the tomato on your McDonald’s burger to your grandma’s biscuits.

Send your submission to us through the photo challenge link at the top of our page. Your photo could be featured right here on our blog!

(Source: theshorthorn.com)

Photoset

Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang (top) wrote:

Passers by walk as rain lightly drizzles on Wednesday afternoon outside of the University Center. Students used umbrellas, ponchos and trash bags to cover from the rain.

Shorthorn photographer Brandon Gray wrote:

Mechanical Engineering Juniors Shimelis Ayalew (left) and Baburaja Maharjan play chess on a gloomy Thursday afternoon in the University. The two played the game to pass time before going to their 3:30 p.m. class.

The rain has hit North Texas and students are trying to find things to do to keep dry.

What is you favorite rain activity? Send us a photo by posting it and using the tag #ShorthornMoment. Your Moment could be featured right here!

(Source: theshorthorn.com)

Photo
Shorthorn photographer Michael Minasi wrote:

Senior first baseman Jordan Vaughn tries to pick off Baylor’s junior catcher Nathan Orf on Saturday at Baylor Ballpark.

When shooting something like sports you have to be on your toes at all times. If you spend too much time on the main thing you’ll miss the quick moments like this. One of Baylor’s players slid back to first base after trying to steal second. To catch moments in the split second that they happen you have to be aware of everything happening on the field and be quick to strike!

Shorthorn photographer Michael Minasi wrote:

Senior first baseman Jordan Vaughn tries to pick off Baylor’s junior catcher Nathan Orf on Saturday at Baylor Ballpark.

When shooting something like sports you have to be on your toes at all times. If you spend too much time on the main thing you’ll miss the quick moments like this. One of Baylor’s players slid back to first base after trying to steal second. To catch moments in the split second that they happen you have to be aware of everything happening on the field and be quick to strike!

(Source: theshorthorn.com)


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote,

History senior Melissa Raindl takes a Crayon to write in her card of encouragement for a local women’s shelter on Wednesday by the University Center Palo Duro Lounge. Raindl wrote, “Stay strong, a mother can never be replaced and today is your day.” The Leadership Center hosted the event to support local women’s shelters and also provide students with a break from dead week.

It’s all in the details.  These emotionally packed cards and their messages carried more weight than any other subject at this event. Hoang took quick notice of this, and used the letter pictured above as a powerful visual anchor to layer his image with.  Over all, a very successful execution of something that could have been easily passed over by a less observant individual.

Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote,

History senior Melissa Raindl takes a Crayon to write in her card of encouragement for a local women’s shelter on Wednesday by the University Center Palo Duro Lounge. Raindl wrote, “Stay strong, a mother can never be replaced and today is your day.” The Leadership Center hosted the event to support local women’s shelters and also provide students with a break from dead week.

It’s all in the details.  These emotionally packed cards and their messages carried more weight than any other subject at this event. Hoang took quick notice of this, and used the letter pictured above as a powerful visual anchor to layer his image with.  Over all, a very successful execution of something that could have been easily passed over by a less observant individual.


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote,

Business managment junior Dora Fernandez is currently in a competition to win a handicap accesible van from the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association for National Mobility Awareness Month. To see Dora’s profile go to http://www.nmeda.com/mobility-awareness-month/heroes/texas/arlington/810/dora-ivonne-fernandez.

It is crucial in photojournalism to tell a story with your photos.  It can be very difficult to do this in a studio, which is why Casey’s choice to photograph the subject in this piece outside in a different context was such a strong conceptual choice. Simply by placing her on the road, he not only gave himself a great compositional leading line with the road, but also linked the photograph back to the story.  This young lady was trying to win a handicap accessible van - a mode of transportation and freedom.

Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote,

Business managment junior Dora Fernandez is currently in a competition to win a handicap accesible van from the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association for National Mobility Awareness Month. To see Dora’s profile go to http://www.nmeda.com/mobility-awareness-month/heroes/texas/arlington/810/dora-ivonne-fernandez.

It is crucial in photojournalism to tell a story with your photos.  It can be very difficult to do this in a studio, which is why Casey’s choice to photograph the subject in this piece outside in a different context was such a strong conceptual choice. Simply by placing her on the road, he not only gave himself a great compositional leading line with the road, but also linked the photograph back to the story.  This young lady was trying to win a handicap accessible van - a mode of transportation and freedom.