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Shorthorn photographer Ashley Bradley wrote,

Alumnus Riyad Elmasri will bring some of his art to the Downtown Front and Center on Saturday and will also play music. Though he tries to make money off of both his talents, he said it’s more about the craft.

Bradley photographed Riyad Elmasri as part of her features story over the Downtown Front and Center festival in Arlington.  Elmasri, an artist that creates sculptures with welding, had a several of his works throughout his backyard.  
"Originally I asked him if I could take a pictures of some of him with his artwork and also with his instruments but when I passed by this piece I really liked it and asked him if he could climb in there.  I didn’t really like the picture at first, but by playing around with the settings on the camera, upping the ISO and changing the aperture, I was able to get the lighting how I wanted it," said Bradley.
By putting Elmasri inside the sculpture Bradley was able to create a natural frame within the frame of the photograph.  This draws the viewer into the photograph and gives it more depth and intrigue.  The late afternoon light cascading down one side of his face made the image higher in contrast and more dramatic.
Check out the full story and more photographs.

Shorthorn photographer Ashley Bradley wrote,

Alumnus Riyad Elmasri will bring some of his art to the Downtown Front and Center on Saturday and will also play music. Though he tries to make money off of both his talents, he said it’s more about the craft.

Bradley photographed Riyad Elmasri as part of her features story over the Downtown Front and Center festival in Arlington.  Elmasri, an artist that creates sculptures with welding, had a several of his works throughout his backyard.  

"Originally I asked him if I could take a pictures of some of him with his artwork and also with his instruments but when I passed by this piece I really liked it and asked him if he could climb in there.  I didn’t really like the picture at first, but by playing around with the settings on the camera, upping the ISO and changing the aperture, I was able to get the lighting how I wanted it," said Bradley.

By putting Elmasri inside the sculpture Bradley was able to create a natural frame within the frame of the photograph.  This draws the viewer into the photograph and gives it more depth and intrigue.  The late afternoon light cascading down one side of his face made the image higher in contrast and more dramatic.

Check out the full story and more photographs.


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote,

Architecture juniors Bernabe Longoria, center, and Samantha Richardson, right, peel off tape from a wooden bench after spray-painting it as architecture  assistant professor Wanda Dye supervises Monday outside of the Fine Arts Building. Students from the School of Urban and Public Affairs and the School of Architecture are working together to provide benches and structures for the Downtown Front and Center event, which will take place on Saturday.

Color is a seductively powerful way to grab the viewer’s attention and capture it.  This is the very reason that Richard Hoang’s wildart of these students with spray-paint is such an impactful image.  The vibrant spray-paint immediately snares the attention of anyone walking by the newspaper rack (which, yes, this is the front page photograph of Wednesday’s issue).
When asked how he found the photograph Hoang said, “After walking around campus I decided to go into the wood shop in the Fine Arts Building and as I was looking around I saw these stools they were making.  I kept searching outside and found these guys spray-painting and I saw it as an opportunity for color.  I was reminded of fruit rollups when I saw the tape covered in paint.”
The same pop of color that drew Hoang to the site in the first place is a very useful compositional element to draw viewers to the final image.

Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote,

Architecture juniors Bernabe Longoria, center, and Samantha Richardson, right, peel off tape from a wooden bench after spray-painting it as architecture  assistant professor Wanda Dye supervises Monday outside of the Fine Arts Building. Students from the School of Urban and Public Affairs and the School of Architecture are working together to provide benches and structures for the Downtown Front and Center event, which will take place on Saturday.

Color is a seductively powerful way to grab the viewer’s attention and capture it.  This is the very reason that Richard Hoang’s wildart of these students with spray-paint is such an impactful image.  The vibrant spray-paint immediately snares the attention of anyone walking by the newspaper rack (which, yes, this is the front page photograph of Wednesday’s issue).

When asked how he found the photograph Hoang said, “After walking around campus I decided to go into the wood shop in the Fine Arts Building and as I was looking around I saw these stools they were making.  I kept searching outside and found these guys spray-painting and I saw it as an opportunity for color.  I was reminded of fruit rollups when I saw the tape covered in paint.”

The same pop of color that drew Hoang to the site in the first place is a very useful compositional element to draw viewers to the final image.


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote,

Jeff Badyna, film and video senior, works on his final for a sculpture class Monday afternoon in the Studio Arts Center. Badyna is building birdhouses onto a wooden frame in the shape of the letters UTA. This piece is a continuation on work he has done in the past; birdhouses are a theme for Badyna.

Photographer Casey Holder was sent on the hunt for wild art and found this art student working on a project.  Though normally a rather straightforward situation, there is an extra dimension of depth and drama in the photograph.  
When asked about the process Holder said, “I wanted to practice backlighting subjects.  It gives an edge light, pops him out.  It makes the whole photograph more dramatic and higher in contrast.”
Backlighting is a time honored tradition in photography, film and stage theatre.  The front lighting makes the person easy to see, but also flattens the subject.  Since photographs and films are already two dimensional, this can be an undesirable effect.  Adding backlighting can bring back a three dimensional element to the photograph.

Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote,

Jeff Badyna, film and video senior, works on his final for a sculpture class Monday afternoon in the Studio Arts Center. Badyna is building birdhouses onto a wooden frame in the shape of the letters UTA. This piece is a continuation on work he has done in the past; birdhouses are a theme for Badyna.

Photographer Casey Holder was sent on the hunt for wild art and found this art student working on a project.  Though normally a rather straightforward situation, there is an extra dimension of depth and drama in the photograph.  

When asked about the process Holder said, “I wanted to practice backlighting subjects.  It gives an edge light, pops him out.  It makes the whole photograph more dramatic and higher in contrast.”

Backlighting is a time honored tradition in photography, film and stage theatre.  The front lighting makes the person easy to see, but also flattens the subject.  Since photographs and films are already two dimensional, this can be an undesirable effect.  Adding backlighting can bring back a three dimensional element to the photograph.