Photo
Shorthorn photographer Ashley Bradley wrote,

Alumnus Riyad Elmasri will bring some of his art to the Downtown Front and Center on Saturday and will also play music. Though he tries to make money off of both his talents, he said it’s more about the craft.

Bradley photographed Riyad Elmasri as part of her features story over the Downtown Front and Center festival in Arlington.  Elmasri, an artist that creates sculptures with welding, had a several of his works throughout his backyard.  
"Originally I asked him if I could take a pictures of some of him with his artwork and also with his instruments but when I passed by this piece I really liked it and asked him if he could climb in there.  I didn’t really like the picture at first, but by playing around with the settings on the camera, upping the ISO and changing the aperture, I was able to get the lighting how I wanted it," said Bradley.
By putting Elmasri inside the sculpture Bradley was able to create a natural frame within the frame of the photograph.  This draws the viewer into the photograph and gives it more depth and intrigue.  The late afternoon light cascading down one side of his face made the image higher in contrast and more dramatic.
Check out the full story and more photographs.

Shorthorn photographer Ashley Bradley wrote,

Alumnus Riyad Elmasri will bring some of his art to the Downtown Front and Center on Saturday and will also play music. Though he tries to make money off of both his talents, he said it’s more about the craft.

Bradley photographed Riyad Elmasri as part of her features story over the Downtown Front and Center festival in Arlington.  Elmasri, an artist that creates sculptures with welding, had a several of his works throughout his backyard.  

"Originally I asked him if I could take a pictures of some of him with his artwork and also with his instruments but when I passed by this piece I really liked it and asked him if he could climb in there.  I didn’t really like the picture at first, but by playing around with the settings on the camera, upping the ISO and changing the aperture, I was able to get the lighting how I wanted it," said Bradley.

By putting Elmasri inside the sculpture Bradley was able to create a natural frame within the frame of the photograph.  This draws the viewer into the photograph and gives it more depth and intrigue.  The late afternoon light cascading down one side of his face made the image higher in contrast and more dramatic.

Check out the full story and more photographs.


Photo
Shorthorn photo editor Michael Minasi wrote,

Software engineering sophomore Tracy Oguni prays in the prayer tent Monday evening on the Central Library mall. Oguni was participating in 72 Hours of Prayer, an event organized by a mix of Christian student organizations such as the Baptist Student Ministry, Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship and more.

72 Hours of Prayer is an event held once a semester, and is typically well covered by Shorthorn staff.  The trick with events like this is trying to find unique perspectives or new ways to shoot them.
"I knew I had time to shoot the event, so I wouldn’t be rushed.  Also, I haven’t had much experience with off camera flash outside of the studio so I wanted to try some on location lighting with the infrared flash system.  After a lot experimenting and struggling, I think I managed to get some interesting shots that captured the intimate and somewhat dramatic moment," said Minasi.
Off-camera flash can create opportunities that allow for completely new ways to creatively execute anything from portraits to on location news.

Shorthorn photo editor Michael Minasi wrote,

Software engineering sophomore Tracy Oguni prays in the prayer tent Monday evening on the Central Library mall. Oguni was participating in 72 Hours of Prayer, an event organized by a mix of Christian student organizations such as the Baptist Student Ministry, Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship and more.

72 Hours of Prayer is an event held once a semester, and is typically well covered by Shorthorn staff.  The trick with events like this is trying to find unique perspectives or new ways to shoot them.

"I knew I had time to shoot the event, so I wouldn’t be rushed.  Also, I haven’t had much experience with off camera flash outside of the studio so I wanted to try some on location lighting with the infrared flash system.  After a lot experimenting and struggling, I think I managed to get some interesting shots that captured the intimate and somewhat dramatic moment," said Minasi.

Off-camera flash can create opportunities that allow for completely new ways to creatively execute anything from portraits to on location news.