Photo
Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote,

Theater arts junior Bridie Corbett talks to the voices in her head, as the mother in the student directed play, WASP during rehearsals Tuesday night in the Studio Theater. Steve Martin wrote this critique on the social culture of the 1950’s in the early 1990’s.

Art lesson: color theory.  Geniuses from eons ago studied color, and came up with a color wheel that explained the relationships of colors to each other.  Colors are divided into two categories: cool and warm.  By combining the warm stage lighting on the actress above, and the cool colors from the old image in the projection, Holder was able to create a dynamic and visually appealing photograph.  
When asked how he got to the photograph, Holder said, “I had been shooting all night with the 70-200 and I wanted to get some variety so I put on the 30 prime.  It gave me the opportunity to get closer and it put her in the foreground and the projection in the background.”
The wider lens gave the composition more room to breath, and for Casey to get close enough to create the low down perspective and get all of the elements in the photograph to come together.
He said, “The lighting for the play, WASP, was done very well, and she has a very warm lighting on her.  I like how she looks warm and inviting and how it contrasts with the background which is an almost blue.  It has that ‘Pleasantville’ vibe and makes her seem so much more alive compared to the cliche’ 50’s scene behind her.”

Shorthorn photographer Casey Holder wrote,

Theater arts junior Bridie Corbett talks to the voices in her head, as the mother in the student directed play, WASP during rehearsals Tuesday night in the Studio Theater. Steve Martin wrote this critique on the social culture of the 1950’s in the early 1990’s.

Art lesson: color theory.  Geniuses from eons ago studied color, and came up with a color wheel that explained the relationships of colors to each other.  Colors are divided into two categories: cool and warm.  By combining the warm stage lighting on the actress above, and the cool colors from the old image in the projection, Holder was able to create a dynamic and visually appealing photograph.  

When asked how he got to the photograph, Holder said, “I had been shooting all night with the 70-200 and I wanted to get some variety so I put on the 30 prime.  It gave me the opportunity to get closer and it put her in the foreground and the projection in the background.”

The wider lens gave the composition more room to breath, and for Casey to get close enough to create the low down perspective and get all of the elements in the photograph to come together.

He said, “The lighting for the play, WASP, was done very well, and she has a very warm lighting on her.  I like how she looks warm and inviting and how it contrasts with the background which is an almost blue.  It has that ‘Pleasantville’ vibe and makes her seem so much more alive compared to the cliche’ 50’s scene behind her.”


Photo
Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote,

Computer science junior Jonathon Griffin dances as visual communication senior Kenneth Le watches during their break dance routine as a part of the Mavs Got Talent Comedy and Show on Thursday at the University Center Rosebud Theatre.

Capturing fast moving subjects in a dimly lit auditorium with no flash photography allowed can seem like a daunting task.  In fact, it is a daunting task.  However, there are ways to combat the fears inherent in this type of assignment.  
"Well, I decided to use the 50mm prime because of how fast paced the dancing is.  I wanted to use a really fast lens to capture the movement," said Hoang.
The Canon 50mm with a 1.8 aperture is a prime example of how to get great photographs on a budget.  The wide aperture allows more light into the lens, enabling you to keep higher shutter speeds and capture more movement. At a retail price of around $120 (sourced from Amazon.com and BHphotovideo.com) it is one of the best ways to get sharp photographs in low light without a flash.

Shorthorn photographer Richard Hoang wrote,

Computer science junior Jonathon Griffin dances as visual communication senior Kenneth Le watches during their break dance routine as a part of the Mavs Got Talent Comedy and Show on Thursday at the University Center Rosebud Theatre.

Capturing fast moving subjects in a dimly lit auditorium with no flash photography allowed can seem like a daunting task.  In fact, it is a daunting task.  However, there are ways to combat the fears inherent in this type of assignment.  

"Well, I decided to use the 50mm prime because of how fast paced the dancing is.  I wanted to use a really fast lens to capture the movement," said Hoang.

The Canon 50mm with a 1.8 aperture is a prime example of how to get great photographs on a budget.  The wide aperture allows more light into the lens, enabling you to keep higher shutter speeds and capture more movement. At a retail price of around $120 (sourced from Amazon.com and BHphotovideo.com) it is one of the best ways to get sharp photographs in low light without a flash.